Solar Power’s Surprising Win in Chile

Chile, Spain, Dubai, solar energy, renewable energy, climate change

Chile has officially debunked the argument that coal is cheaper than solar.

Solarpack Corp. Technologica, a Spanish developer, won contracts to sell solar power for $29.10 per megawatt-hour at an energy auction in August, the lowest price ever. Not only does this beat out the deal in Dubai from last May, it went for almost half the price of coal at the same event. Chilean solar power is now at one of the lowest rates for any kind of electricity anywhere, according to Solarpack General Director Inigo Malo de Molina.

“Solar energy technology has evolved and proved it is competitive,” Molina told Bloomberg in a telephone interview from Santiago. “Prices for electricity generation have changed drastically in the last years. Solar energy in Chile is now the cheapest in the market.”

From Energy Crisis to Energy Abundance

It’s an amazing turn-around, given the county’s recent energy woes. Just five years ago, Chile’s energy prices were among the highest in Latin America. A few monopolistic utility companies dominated the sector, and Argentina had stopped selling natural gas to its neighbor. Facing the risk of blackouts, the private sector planned to open more coal-burning power plants and build hydroelectric dams that would have flooded Patagonia.

But mass protests soon followed. In 2010, the movement became so powerful that then-president Sebastián Piñera shut down the coal project Barrancones, even though its developer, GDF Suez, was following the law. While it was a win for the environment, the decision seriously harmed Chile’s business reputation.

Today, renewable power is on the rise, with energy investment surpassing mining investment in a nation that’s the largest copper producer in the world. Chile even started exporting electricity and natural gas to Argentina earlier this year.

So what brought on such a rapid change? In a word: competition. There were 84 bids during this month’s power auction, with the winners signing 20-year power purchase agreements. And in a surprising turn, three of Chile’s four largest generators failed to win a supply contract.

The biggest win went to Granja Solar, Solarpack’s project, a near impossible feat a few years earlier. Until recently, solar power couldn’t compete without subsidies, but the falling price of solar panels has made this form of energy more appealing. The average price has declined to a record low of 44.7 cents a watt for standard polysilicon panels.

Why Chile?

The new plant will break ground in Northern Chile’s Atacama Desert, an ideal location given its position high in the Andes near the equator. It’s one of the sunniest and driest places in the world, making it a rich option when it comes to solar power.

The Chilean government is also on board. It plans to complete transmission lines that will deliver Granja Solar’s power to the entire country, which is why Solarpack bid so low, Molina told Bloomberg.

Solar power wasn’t the only success, either. Renewable-energy companies won more than half the contracts this time around. The lowest price for wind power was $31 per megawatt-hour, natural gas sold for $47, hydroelectricity for $60, and geothermal for $66, according to Bloomberg.

The triumph of renewable energy at Chile’s recent auction is a strong indicator that the energy sector is in transition. Companies looking to compete will need to adapt quickly if they want to remain competitive, which is a major win for both consumers and the environment.

Comments

Jack Pearce

Jennifer, I appreciated this article, and am interested in following any further work you may do relating to solar and wind energy development. 

Did you know that according to a 2008 Sandia Labs report, it may be feasible to convert electricity to chemical fuels, say for transport uses, at @2c kwhr?  I was surprised to see your report of @3c already.  I was assuming we were a decade or more away from this level.

 

Jack Pearce

jack@osioffices.com

Jeslin Varghese

Renewable Energy sector is bound to grow around the world! This is a great article. I encourage you to visit https://www.gbrionline.org/articles/ for articles related to sustainability, green buildings and LEED. In addtion, we have 100s of courses on topics ranging from LEED, WELL, Energy Modeling, Estidama, Solar, BIM, Sustainable Travel, Eco Tourism, Sustainable Olympics, E-waste, CSR, etc. to name a few. Please check out https://www.gbrionline.org/learning-hub

Jack S. Ramirez

Solar energy is a natural resource and it must be made essential to all the other ways. When it's utilized in such way then definitely its a saving of electricity. This solar power projects seems to be very effective as i have read on essaywriter news. I hope for the best here today and looking forward to it.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this blog post do not necessarily reflect the official policy of Citizens for Global Solutions.

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