Tad Daley

Guest Blogger

Tad Daley, JD, PhD, is the Director of the Project on Abolishing War at The Center for War / Peace Studies in New York City, www.abolishingwar.org. His first book, Apocalypse Never: Forging the Path to a Nuclear Weapon-Free World, was released by Rutgers University Press in 2010, and then again in paperback in 2012. Tad formerly served as a speechwriter and policy advisor for both Congressman Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio, 1997-2013), and the late US Senator Alan Cranston (D-Cal, 1969-1993). It is a poignant connection for us here at CGS, since Alan Cranston served as president of our own organization, then known as the United World Federalists, from 1949 to 1952.

Reimagining the United Nations: A 2020 Vision

Future Parliament

This essay is a revised and updated version of the cover story for the Fall/Winter 2015 issue of DISARMAMENT TIMES, the journal of the United Nations NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security.


"Does the United Nations Still Matter?" It often seems so irrelevant to the problems of the modern age that those words appeared last year on the front page of The New Republic magazine. More than seven decades after the UN's invention in 1945, our multiple planetary crises seem dramatically different from those confronting the generation that emerged from the rubble of the Second World War. Isn’t it time to devise architectures of global governance intended not to avoid the mistakes of the 1930s, but focused instead on the intertwined predicaments of our own 21st Century?

A New Global Governance Commission

If so, we have a new guide to start the journey. It’s the report from the “Commission on Global Security, Justice, and Governance,” co-chaired by former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former UN Under-Secretary-General Ibrahim Gambari. The name they chose reflects the inescapable links the Commission sees among those three variables. Their report elaborately makes the case that we can’t have security anywhere without justice, or justice anywhere without security. And it asserts that nothing could do more to provide both security and justice to much of humanity than smart 21st Century innovations in global governance.

An Aging UN in 2015. But How About a New UN in 2020?


The new report from the Commission on Global Security, Justice, and Governance, co-chaired by former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, suggests that the 75th anniversary year in 2020 might be the moment to reinvent the United Nations.

What kind of United Nations would we invent if we were designing it from scratch today? The UN Charter was signed by President Harry S. Truman and other world leaders in San Francisco on June 26th, 1945, and came into force three months later on October 24th. A long seven decades later, our world seems smaller, our fates more intertwined, and our challenges drastically different from those confronting the generation that emerged from the rubble of the Second World War. Is it time to begin devising architectures of global governance not "to avoid the mistakes of the 1930s," but instead intended for our own unfolding 21st Century?

One Country. One Constitution. One Destiny.


​Today, April 15, 2015, is the 150th anniversary of the death of Abraham Lincoln. He was shot shortly after 10 PM on the night of April 14th, 1865, inside Ford's Theatre, then was carried across the street: 10th Street, between E and F, NW, to the Petersen boarding house, where he expired at 7:22 AM the next morning.

Since I live in Washington, DC, and since I am usually a bit of a night owl, I spent some time there last night and into this morning. The solemnity of the candlelight vigil in the middle of 10th Street in the middle of the night, commemorating the hours when the president lay dying, was quite moving to me -- and, it seemed, to virtually all the participants.

Tad Daley inside Ford's Theatre at 11:15 pm EDT on the night of April 14th, 2015, directly across from the box where U. S. President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated exactly 150 years earlierI spent some time touring the museum in the Ford's Theatre basement, and the recently-opened "Center for Education and Leadership" immediately adjacent to the Petersen House. I have done this before and will undoubtedly do it again.

But this time, I noticed something new.