Tad Daley

Guest Blogger

Tad Daley, JD, PhD, is the Director of the Project on Abolishing War at The Center for War / Peace Studies in New York City, www.abolishingwar.org. His first book, Apocalypse Never: Forging the Path to a Nuclear Weapon-Free World, was released by Rutgers University Press in 2010, and then again in paperback in 2012. Tad formerly served as a speechwriter and policy advisor for both Congressman Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio, 1997-2013), and the late US Senator Alan Cranston (D-Cal, 1969-1993). It is a poignant connection for us here at CGS, since Alan Cranston served as president of our own organization, then known as the United World Federalists, from 1949 to 1952.

An Aging UN in 2015. But How About a New UN in 2020?

The new report from the Commission on Global Security, Justice, and Governance, co-chaired by former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, suggests that the 75th anniversary year in 2020 might be the moment to reinvent the United Nations.

What kind of United Nations would we invent if we were designing it from scratch today? The UN Charter was signed by President Harry S. Truman and other world leaders in San Francisco on June 26th, 1945, and came into force three months later on October 24th. A long seven decades later, our world seems smaller, our fates more intertwined, and our challenges drastically different from those confronting the generation that emerged from the rubble of the Second World War. Is it time to begin devising architectures of global governance not "to avoid the mistakes of the 1930s," but instead intended for our own unfolding 21st Century?

One Country. One Constitution. One Destiny.

​Today, April 15, 2015, is the 150th anniversary of the death of Abraham Lincoln. He was shot shortly after 10 PM on the night of April 14th, 1865, inside Ford's Theatre, then was carried across the street: 10th Street, between E and F, NW, to the Petersen boarding house, where he expired at 7:22 AM the next morning.

Since I live in Washington, DC, and since I am usually a bit of a night owl, I spent some time there last night and into this morning. The solemnity of the candlelight vigil in the middle of 10th Street in the middle of the night, commemorating the hours when the president lay dying, was quite moving to me -- and, it seemed, to virtually all the participants.

Tad Daley inside Ford's Theatre at 11:15 pm EDT on the night of April 14th, 2015, directly across from the box where U. S. President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated exactly 150 years earlierI spent some time touring the museum in the Ford's Theatre basement, and the recently-opened "Center for Education and Leadership" immediately adjacent to the Petersen House. I have done this before and will undoubtedly do it again.

But this time, I noticed something new.

Revisiting "The Grand Bargain of the NPT"

President Lyndon Johnson looking on as Secretary of State Dean Rusk prepares to sign the NPT, 1 July 1968.

On March 5, humanity celebrated the 45th anniversary of the coming into force of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). We also celebrated one more day of dodging the nuclear bullet, sitting in the chamber of the gun in our own hands. Along with my colleagues at CGS, I am convinced that we will not dodge this bullet indefinitely—unless someday the nations of the world comply with all the terms of the NPT and abolish nuclear weapons forever from the face of the earth.

So as a relatively new CGS guest blogger, I offer you a piece I published on the Huffington Post five years ago, excerpted from my book Apocalypse Never, to commemorate the NPT's 40th anniversary and to explain what the treaty is fundamentally about.

You might want to read it quickly.

Because that bullet, aimed at each and every one of the 7.2 billion human souls alive today—not to mention the infinite number of our future descendants who have not yet even had the chance to be born —is not staying in that chamber forever.