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Category: Human Rights

The New UN Peacekeeping Mandate in South Sudan: What Does it All Mean?

http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/english/2014/05/tribute-paid-to-un-peacekeepers-around-the-world/#.VwvxWfkrKUk

The United Nations is now warning of a potential famine in South Sudan. Though South Sudan had agreed to ceasefires in January and again in early May, they did not last. The UN had to act quickly because with the surges of violence, there has been an increase in secondary deaths due to starvation and disease. The conflict has heavily interrupted the crop-growing season by displacing farmers, and the UN estimates that if the violence does not stop, famine will ensue.

On May 27th the UN Security Council passed Resolution 2155, which renews the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), but makes some important amendments. From this resolution, a civilian protection mandate was added to address the growing humanitarian and security needs. This stems from un-subsiding violence that broke out in December when President Salva Kiir fired his rival Riek Machar from the deputy president position. This event fueled underlying ethnic tensions between the Dinka who support Kiir and the Nuer who support Machar.

This action of civilian protection from the UN is a huge step in the right direction with regards to UN involvement in conflicts. The UN has a record of not taking appropriate action quickly enough, most notably in Rwanda in 1994; hopefully this is a sign of changes to come.

The Holy See and the United Nations: Sovereignty vs. Rights

http://blogs.usembassy.gov/hackett/

For months an ongoing battle has emerged in world headlines as the Vatican, the center of the Catholic faith, has been embroiled in an ongoing investigation from the UN’s watchdog agency on torture.

The reason for the UN’s involvement is the Holy See’s membership to the Convention against Torture (CAT), which a sustained global campaign from victim advocacy groups say is being violated by the Vatican’s past and present actions in dealing with victims of child abuse.

According to the Vatican the United Nations Committee against Torture, which oversees the implementation of CAT, has recently found the Holy See not to be in violation of the treaty. However, the CAT Committee refuted this interpretation, with Felice D Gaer CAT’s American vice-chair stating, “we don't use the word 'violation'; others do. But it's quite clear [the Vatican is] not in conformity with the requirements of the convention."

This case set a new precedent ,as Al-Jazeera reports, “it was the first time the Vatican had been scrutinized since it signed up in 2002 to a global convention banning cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment and punishment.”

To give context to the situation, consider that over 848 priests have been defrocked and another 2,572 given lesser sanctions over the past decade, according to Fox. As with many abuse-related crimes, only a tiny percentage are ever reported, let alone prosecuted.

The Gender Pay Gap: How We Can Escape the Double-Standard

1967 - "Commission begins consideration for Economic Rights for Women" http://www.unmultimedia.org/photo/detail.jsp?id=930/93043&key=13&query=subject:%22Women%20of%20the%20World%22&so=0&sf=date

At the White House Correspondents’ Dinner this year, President Obama really showed what he was made of. With jokes on everything from his healthcare.gov rollout to the Chris Christie bridge closure debacle, he showed that he can take criticism and laugh about it. Obama also took a stab at the gender pay gap and the prospect of Hilary Clinton becoming president, saying that, “as the first female president, we could pay her 30 percent less. That's a savings this country could use." While a funny remark that elicits laughs, what people need to realize is that it is actually not far from the truth.

In a recent study it was found that women earn on average 77 cents to every dollar that men earn in the same profession. In a supposed democratic and equal-opportunity country, this is absurd. To try and fight this President Obama recently issued two executive orders that allow employees to discuss their pay and require employers to report pay data based on gender and race, hoping to increase transparency in the workplace and close the ridiculous pay gaps that exists.

Indian Elections: The Power of the Millennial Vote

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narendra_Modi#/media/File:Narendra_Modi_addressing_Vijay_Shankhnad_Rally_in_Meerut.jpg

 After winning a landslide victory, Narenda Modi is now officially the Prime Minister elect of India. The race was far from close: Modi won by the largest margin in 30 years for a prime ministerial candidate. Alongside Modi, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) is set to win far more than the 272 seats it needs to form a majority, a feat not accomplished since the assassination of Indira Gandhi and the subsequent change in public sentiment towards the Congress – the leaders of the current government and BJP’s bitter rival for decades.

India, much like the US, has a two-party system. The key to such an astonishing victory has many parallels to the US election of Barack Obama in 2008, in which the BJP was able to pull in a record number of Millennials (those 35 and under).

In fact, Millennials play a larger role in Indian politics than they do in US politics. Why? The answer, some analysts say, may be as simple as a faster-growing demographic, the effect of which is compounded by the rapid adoption of mobile technology throughout the country.

The city which perhaps best exemplifies this trend is Bangalore. Bangalore is India’s third-largest city and second-fastest growing, where an astonishing 63 percent of its population is under 25. The influence of such a young population has repercussions throughout the state. “We have no toilets in my home village, but everybody has a smartphone, and we all check every day for what’s happening in the [2014] campaign,” states 22-year-old Hanamanthray Biradar, who is from a city in the same state as Bangalore.

The Peace of Westphalia?

The Peace of Westphalia? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peace_of_Westphalia

Nearly 300 young girls are still missing in Nigeria where they were kidnapped nearly a month ago by a murderous group of extremists calling themselves Boko Haram. They have claimed credit for this crime and intend to sell the young girls as sex slaves to help pay for future murders and crimes.

There are many contributing factors to this mass kidnapping, but the primary reason these girls were not rescued immediately or shortly thereafter is the world's persistence acceptance of "national sovereignty" as the dominant paradigm of global governance.

In other words, humanity still accepts the right of every national government to do whatever it wants, whenever it wants, to whomever it wants within its own borders. This barbaric paradigm was established nearly 400 years ago by the Treaty of Westphalia and remains today as the primary agreement between nations.

President Obama recently claimed there is nothing we can do about this crime against humanity because Nigeria is a Sovereign state. We offered some help once that government responded to our diplomatic cries, but that took weeks. Now it will be infinitely harder to find these girls and return those that are still alive to their grieving mothers.

The mind-numbing reality is that even if the UN had decided to take action immediately, it couldn't have done so without first getting a decision by the UN Security Council. And, even with it, the UN has no established police force or SWAT team with a mandate or the capacity to protect innocent lives on short notice. National governments, including the US, has made sure of that. That is how strongly we still believe in the supremacy of nations' sovereignty.

The Revocation of Nationality: Statelessness in the Dominican Republic

Most of us take our citizenship for granted, thinking the world belongs to people of one nation or another, but imagine being stripped of it completely.

In a world run by nation-states, there is no universal form of citizenship or birth registration. There are only those recognized by national governments that can and do revoke it for various political motives. The estimated number to date by the UNHCR of stateless persons, families and communities who have no nation to legally call home is 10 million.

The most recent of these tragedies occurred in September, when the Constitutional Court of the Dominican Republic passed a ruling which de-nationalized an estimated 210,000 Haitian citizens by denying them citizenship and the right to an official ID. This simple act by courts, which has deeply affected the lives of nearly 7 percent of the country’s population either directly or indirectly, receives an overwhelming 83 percent of support from Dominicans.

Having your citizenship taken away can deal a powerful blow to your wellbeing. As one rights activist featured in an Aljazeera piece states, “It’s not that I feel Dominican. I am Dominican. I was born here in the Dominican Republic, and all my documents are from here… I have never been in another country.”

Polio’s Resurgence and the Globalization of Disease

A health volunteer vaccinates a one year old boy against polio in Kabul, Afghanistan, 2009 (UN Photo/Jawad Jalali)

Last week, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a global health emergency stating that polio is rapidly re-emerging as a threat – its expansion in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, and Cameroon is truly concerning despite the disease being nearly eradicated in the last few years. The emergency status used includes requirements that people cannot travel from affected countries without evidence of vaccination, and each country is taking additional steps where possible to step up its anti-polio programs.

It didn’t have to be this way. While polio is a devastating illness that paralyzes and sometimes kills its victims, vaccination usually prevents the disease from taking hold. The problem isn’t just that these states have remote or tribal areas that are difficult to reach with vaccines – many states have remote regions and have been able to reach them with state-, UN-, or donor-operated vaccination programs.

Human Rights Battle: US v. North Korea

Last Monday, North Korea released its own human rights report aimed at the US. This report, a direct response to the critical UN report on North Korea published in February, called the US “the world’s worst human rights abuser.” It also labeled the US as “a living hell, as elementary rights to existence are ruthlessly violated.”

As evidence to these harsh claims, the report cites US poverty statistics, the luxurious life of the president, and the racial discrimination and injustice surrounding Trayvon Martin’s murder. While these cases do hold weight, the facts have been distorted to paint our nation as a human rights abuser on par with North Korea itself. For example, the report rightfully cites Trayvon Martin’s case as an example of racial inequality, but incorrectly labels his killer as a white cop, blurring the line between fact and fiction.

I will be the first to say that the US still has a long way to go to make equality and human rights a reality for all people. However, this report is a bit too much of the pot calling the kettle black. Pointing to North Korea and saying, ‘well at least we’re not as bad as them,’ is no justification for our own problems--but neither is it for them.

North Korea has a terrible human rights record, and just because we cannot get into the country to see it does not mean it doesn’t exist. Pointing the finger back at the US only serves to perpetuate the conversation around North Korea’s own record, effectively defeating the purpose of the report.

With this report Kim Jung-un might be saying, "Hey US, people in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones." But then again, neither should you, North Korea.

Stop the War on International Law

The Senate’s failure to adopt a single global agreement dealing with human rights, arms control, or the environment since 1997 has damaged the United States’ security, economy, and global leadership. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/don-kraus/stop-the-war-on-internati_b_5282656.html

“The children were all asleep in bed and I was just going off to sleep…when I heard people outside saying chemical bombs were being dropped around us,” said Samer, a Syrian refugee. His children survived the chemical weapons attack in Ghouta on the outskirts of Damascus in 2013.

Thankfully, by mid-April of this year, 93% of the Syrian chemical weapon stockpiles have been removed by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the watchdog arm of the Chemical Weapons Convention. The United States and other parties to this treaty had worked through the UN Security Council and pressured Syria to accede to the Convention.  They are now pushing for the remaining chemicals to be destroyed. 

But despite the successful use of international law to take these horrendous weapons out of play in the Syrian civil war, another kind of war is being fought within the United States.  The frontlines of the War on International Law stretch from the Senate floor to the living rooms of home-schoolers. 

A coordinated and well-funded opposition is doing everything it can to stop the US from ratifying any multilateral treaties. And, to the detriment of our nation and the world, they’re winning.  The Senate’s failure to adopt a single global agreement dealing with human rights, arms control, or the environment since 1997--when it agreed to the Chemical Weapons Convention--has damaged the United States’ security, economy, and global leadership. 

Missing Nigerian Girls: Where is the Media Now?

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:BringBackOurGirls_truck.jpg

On April 15th, 234 Nigerian school girls aged 16-18 were abducted from their school by a known terrorist group, Boko Haram. The next day a South Korean ferry sank, killing 260+ people on board, most of who were students. Both of these events are newsworthy tragedies. But while most of you reading this know about the ferry in South Korea, many probably never heard about the missing Nigerian girls.

Most media chose to ignore this story, and reports they may have been pulling together were eclipsed by the ferry disaster. For the past two months CNN continued almost non-stop coverage of the search for Malaysia Airlines plane 370, which went missing in early March. Where are those green screens and field reporters for these missing girls? Only now, almost a month later, has there been any significant news coverage on the efforts to locate and rescue the Nigerian girls.

Anyone who watches crime shows can probably tell you that the most crucial time to find kidnapping victims is in the first 12-24 hours. The Nigerian government stated 24 hours after the abductions that all of the girls had returned safely, when in fact almost no effort had been made to even begin looking for them, let alone coordinate a rescue effort. The 30 girls who have made it back home escaped of their own initiative with no help from the government.